Tuesday, September 16, 2014

iwishiwaspattismith:

Made some more stickers to put around campus and Santa Fe

Saturday, September 13, 2014

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Friday, September 12, 2014

so let me get this straight

cry-fuckboi:

Doctors non-consenually cut me open and mutilated my body multiple times in attempts to remove ALL “female” parts of me.
And now that I want to be the woman they tried so desperately to erase, I can’t? 

And I have seen dyadic people make posts about this before - but this is ACTUALLY something I have had to live through so take a seat, and amplify what I am saying instead of talking over intersex people.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

visualtraining:

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 

Those stories are now being told on social media

muslim americans as well as arab americans regardless of religious background and poc arbitrarily perceived to be arab

Sunday, September 7, 2014
everything-is-a-baited-hook:

Women perform 66 percent of the world’s work, produce 50 percent of the food, but earn 10 percent of the income and own 1 percent of the property (UNICEF, ‘Gender Equality – The Big Picture’, 2007.)
 

everything-is-a-baited-hook:

Women perform 66 percent of the world’s work, produce 50 percent of the food, but earn 10 percent of the income and own 1 percent of the property (UNICEF, ‘Gender Equality – The Big Picture’, 2007.)

 

my mad fat diary meme
[7/9] quotes

(Source: tracy-mcconell)

Sunday, August 31, 2014
I think too much. I think ahead. I think behind. I think sideways. I think it all. If it exists, I’ve fucking thought of it. Winona Ryder (via everyday-islike-sunday)
Maybe if we cut unemployment benefits, poor people would have more incentive to find work. Economics major, unknown year (via shitrichcollegekidssay)

a friendly reminder

marfmellow:

that calling women of color exotic is

  • fucking racist
  • dehumanizing
  • othering
  • and not a fucking compliment